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New materials can convert sulfur dioxide from toxic gases to useful products

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Researchers have shown that thanks to new materials composed of specific polymers, harmful sulfur dioxide can be “trapped” and turned into useful compounds. This system can reduce sulfur dioxide emissions by selectively trapping contaminant molecules in a specially designed “cage.”

This trapped gas must not be stored, but can be used for various industrial processes and various types of products after conversion. The material is made up of porous molecules, also known as organic molecular structures (MOFs), inside which are spaces that function as cages. Researchers have found that they can be very efficiently separated from gas mixtures at high temperatures, including the presence of water, by exposing them to lab-simulated vehicle exhaust.

According to the same researchers, this new method is much more efficient than other methods to capture sulfur dioxide. In fact, other methods disperse many solid and liquid wastes, removing up to 95% of harmful gases. Furthermore, as Gemma Smith, the lead author of this study pointed out, “The regeneration pass is very efficient in terms of energy compared to what has been reported in other studies. Sulfur is released at room temperature to convert it into a useful product, while the organometallic structure can be reused for more separation cycles.”

Sulfur dioxide pollution is caused by human activities, particularly those related to power plants, industrial activities, trains, ships and heavy machinery. This research was published in Nature Materials.


Related articles & sources:

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/transforming-sulphur-dioxide-from-harmful-to-useful/

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41563-019-0495-0

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https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c5/a1/09/c5a1098cf5b338e8a2da4639311d01cb.jpg

John Mitchell

I am a senior Python and Flask developer, currently working in silicon valley for a major tech company. During my spare time, I will contribute to Xaski News to report on different scientific research that I find interesting. I am an avid reader of many different publications including Cosmos, Popular Mechanics and Scientific American.

2038 Ella Street, San Francisco California, 94143
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John Mitchell
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Science

Neanderthal’s were also skilled divers to collect bivalves and shells

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When we think of Neanderthals our thoughts usually go to hunter-gatherers but these hominids were most likely also skilled swimmers and were also able to dive underwater to collect seafood. This is the result of a study conducted by a team of researchers led by Paola Villa of the University of Colorado Boulder who analyzed several findings found in the Grotta dei Moscerini, a cave located near a beach in Lazio.

Already several decades ago archaeologists had collected several interesting artifacts and remains of animal planets, mostly shells, from this area but the team of researchers revealed new secrets in a new study that appeared on PLOS ONE. The Neanderthals not only collected shells and any edible marine animals that lay on the beach but also dived several meters to better meet their dietary needs.

These clues show that the Neanderthals actually had a much deeper relationship with the sea than previously thought, something that many paleoanthropologists did not pay much attention to. Villa, together with his colleagues, analyzed the tools that the Neanderthals used to work the shells in order to transform them into useful cutting tools.

Many of the shells found showed dull and slightly abraded exteriors, as if they had been polished over time, indicating that they had been taken from a sandy beach. However, several other shells, at least a quarter of the total, show that they were torn directly from their natural habitat at the bottom of the sea.

According to the researcher, the Neanderthals used to submerge to a depth of up to four meters to collect live seafood and bivalves, naturally without any diving equipment, which indicates a certain degree of skill, probably equal to that of Homo sapiens, at least as far as obtaining food from the deep water.

This study will help to change the idea of Neanderthals seen as hunters of large mammals.

John Mitchell

I am a senior Python and Flask developer, currently working in silicon valley for a major tech company. During my spare time, I will contribute to Xaski News to report on different scientific research that I find interesting. I am an avid reader of many different publications including Cosmos, Popular Mechanics and Scientific American.

2038 Ella Street, San Francisco California, 94143
[email protected]
415-560-6512
John Mitchell
Continue Reading

Science

Bizarre objects discovered around a black hole in the centre of the Milky Way

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A team of astronomers believes they have discovered a new class of cosmic objects after observing “bizarre objects” at the center of our galaxy, in the very region where there is a huge supermassive black hole called Sagittarius A.

It seems to be somewhere between a gas condensate and a star, as suggested by Andrea Ghez, professor of astrophysics and director of the Galactic Center Group at the University of California at Los Angeles. In the study, published in Nature, compact objects are described that at a certain point seem to stretch as they approach the black hole. The orbit of these objects is relatively long and can range from 100 to 1000 years, as explained by Anna Ciurlo, another UCLA researcher involved in the same study.

The objects, called G3, G4, G5 and G6, stand alongside two other objects (G1, discovered in 2005, and G2, discovered 2012) previously discovered that were very strange. All these objects, according to Ghez and colleagues, could be the result of the fusion of binary stars, i.e. stars that rotate around each other attracted by their gravity.

These pairs of stars, once they reach a point in their orbit very close to Sagittarius A*, seem to merge because of the immense gravitational force of this supermassive black hole, a process, the process of fusion, which takes more than a million years to complete.

According to the researchers, these objects, whose form and substance are apparently not understood, could really be the final product of fusion, a product arrived in a state of relative “calm.” However, we are talking about an extreme environment, the one around the black hole at the center of the Milky Way, which has a density of stars much higher than our galactic quarter, at least a billion times, according to what Ghez himself explains.

In a region like this, not only the gravitational attraction is very strong, but also the magnetic fields can be considered “extreme.” Precisely for this reason, we should not be so surprised if, in a region like this, we find something that, at least initially, we cannot explain its features or its oddities.

John Mitchell

I am a senior Python and Flask developer, currently working in silicon valley for a major tech company. During my spare time, I will contribute to Xaski News to report on different scientific research that I find interesting. I am an avid reader of many different publications including Cosmos, Popular Mechanics and Scientific American.

2038 Ella Street, San Francisco California, 94143
[email protected]
415-560-6512
John Mitchell
Continue Reading

Science

Blood vessels of women age before those of men

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Women’s blood vessels appear to age faster than men’s according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Smidt Heart Institute. Among other things, this study could explain why, with regard to different heart diseases, women heal at different times than men.

The study, published in JAMA Cardiology, shows in particular that the blood arteries, both the larger ones and the smaller ones, seem to age faster, which confirms a different physiology also with regard to the blood system of women than men. Researcher Susan Channing, senior author of the study, together with colleagues analyzed data from 145 blood pressure measurements collected over a period of 43 years from a total of 32,833 patients aged between 5 and 98 years, so a fairly large and diverse database.

Comparing the data of women with those of men, the researchers found that the evolution of the vascular function of females is “very different” from that of males. For example, women showed levels of increased blood pressure earlier in life than men. This means that if the same danger thresholds for hypertension are used for both males and females, a 30-year-old woman with hypertension is still at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease than a man of the same age and with the same level of hypertension.

These are concepts that should make us rethink the methods that are used today to treat the various heart diseases and in general make us rethink female cardiovascular health. Specifically, as Christine Albert, President of the Department of Cardiology at the aforementioned institute, explains, different aspects of today’s cardiovascular therapies must be adapted specifically for women.

Moreover, the results obtained from studies conducted on men cannot be applied directly to women.

John Mitchell

I am a senior Python and Flask developer, currently working in silicon valley for a major tech company. During my spare time, I will contribute to Xaski News to report on different scientific research that I find interesting. I am an avid reader of many different publications including Cosmos, Popular Mechanics and Scientific American.

2038 Ella Street, San Francisco California, 94143
[email protected]
415-560-6512
John Mitchell
Continue Reading

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