Connect with us

Science

Dinosaurs relied on an “evaporation” area to dissipate heat in the head

Published

on

Dinosaurs developed in many different ways over time, but all faced the same problem, especially in regard to heat dissipation in my head. In fact, the level of overheating is too high and can damage the brain. According to a new study published in Anatomical Record, the largest dinosaur solved the problem in a variety of ways and used a possible dissipation scheme.

Small dinosaurs were able to hide in the shade during the hottest days of the day, but large dinosaurs such as long-necked sauropods and armored dinosaurs found it more difficult to avoid overheating. Many dinosaur species relied on evaporation, the technology still used to cool things. In particular, as far as our body is concerned, it is evaporative cooling by sweat that causes the temperature to drop slightly when the body itself overheats.

Researchers study birds, the modern parents of dinosaurs, and understand how they rely on this type of cooling. They followed the blood flow of the evaporative cooling site to the brain. This is an inherently moist area, such as the eyes, nose, mouth, that cools the blood as it goes to the brain. They also measured bone channels and grooves that carry blood vessels.

As Ruger Porter, the lead author of the study, explains, “The bone grooves and grooves found in modern birds and reptiles are linked to dinosaur fossils. Using these bone tests, we wanted to see how their blood flow patterns can be restored and how they deal with their thermophysiology and heat.”

They concluded that larger dinosaurs had a vascular pattern that emphasized specific areas of cooling, typically areas of different genus or species.

For example, sauropods emphasized both the nasal cavity and mouth as cooling areas, whereas sauropods emphasized the nose.


Related articles & sources:

https://www.ohio.edu/news/2019/10/new-ohio-study-shows-huge-dinosaurs-evolved-different-cooling-systems-combat-heat

https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ar.24234

Image Souce:

https://scx2.b-cdn.net/gfx/news/hires/2019/5da86a3535baf.jpg

Katie Lopez

I previously studied Political Science and am now enrolled in Florida State University as an Applied Mathematics major. I am an established writer and am responsible for not only researching and writing new stories, but also proofreading and editing content here.

3713 Steve Hunt Road, Ft Lauderdale Florida, 33311
[email protected]
561-523-7467
Katie Lopez
Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Science

Scientists study genes regulating dog coat colours

Published

on

Studying a breed of Irish setter, a study team at UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine discovered a new genetic element that underlies the regulation of coat color in dogs. Specifically, the researchers studied the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, a medium-sized hunting dog, often referred to as a toller.

According to the researchers, the particular color of the coat of these dogs derives from two particular pigments, yellow (pheomelanin) and black (eumelanin). These two pigments, in turn, are regulated by the MC1R genes (melanocortin receptor 1) and the agouti signaling protein (ASIP). Depending on the mutation of MC1R, the coat of these dogs may produce more or less pheomelanin and appear more or less yellow or red.

Specifically, dogs with a larger number of copies of the DNA region on chromosome 15 have more intense coat colors while animals with a smaller number of copies have a lighter coat.

The study, which appeared in Genes, shows how much there is still to know about the different coat colours of dogs, even of other breeds. The study was carried out by senior author Danika Bannasch and graduate student Kalie Weich.

Katie Lopez

I previously studied Political Science and am now enrolled in Florida State University as an Applied Mathematics major. I am an established writer and am responsible for not only researching and writing new stories, but also proofreading and editing content here.

3713 Steve Hunt Road, Ft Lauderdale Florida, 33311
[email protected]
561-523-7467
Katie Lopez
Continue Reading

Science

According to a famous designer, future architects will be useless due to artificial intelligence

Published

on

According to New York designer Sebastian Errazuriz, architects are among the many occupations and activities that could be literally replaced by advances in technology related to artificial intelligence. Architect and designer Elaziriz later made these statements into a series of films published on his Instagram account and later covered them in a statement.

According to ErraZuriz, it is almost impossible for an architect to compete with an artificial intelligence algorithm, and this will become a reality in the near future, so the architect himself said that “90% of the work is at risk. It is important to warn of this as soon as possible.”

In this regard, in one of the Instagram posts, the designer released an animation developed by new software that can generate building plans in a fully automated way. And this is what can happen today. Imagine this kind of technology 1000 times more powerful now.

Machine learning is becoming more and more proficient, and software can literally store large amounts of data and knowledge related to building technology in seconds. In the future, Ella Zuriz predicts that by setting various features such as budget, size, etc., getting a project in seconds will give customers more details about the type of building they want.

The same customer can “visit” the building through augmented reality technology, even before the foundation is built.

According to Elaziriz, the only architect who will survive are architects practicing architecture as an art, but that is a small elite, and at best only 1% of all architects. Everything else is doomed.


Related articles & sources:

https://www.dezeen.com/2019/10/22/artificial-intelligence-ai-architects-jobs-sebastian-errazuriz/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sebastian_ErraZuriz

https://www.instagram.com/tv/B3jzjj0joCf/

Image Souce:

http://futurearchitectureplatform.org/media/froala/ai-1.jpg

Katie Lopez

I previously studied Political Science and am now enrolled in Florida State University as an Applied Mathematics major. I am an established writer and am responsible for not only researching and writing new stories, but also proofreading and editing content here.

3713 Steve Hunt Road, Ft Lauderdale Florida, 33311
[email protected]
561-523-7467
Katie Lopez
Continue Reading

Science

Arctic permafrost: imminent thawing more serious than previously thought

Published

on

Scientists have repeatedly mentioned the dangers associated with melting Arctic permafrost. This type of soil is a risk that stems from the fact that it is a truly massive carbon deposit that increases dramatically when released into the environment and has unpredictable effects. The amount of carbon dioxide in the air further accelerates the ongoing global warming process.

A new warning has been issued, published today at Nature Climate Change. This is a study with a decisive tone, saying that permafrost is melting more and more in the northern part of the planet, and is probably releasing much more carbon than previously calculated. The same researchers predict that CO2 emissions in the environment will increase by 17% “in moderate mitigation scenarios” until 2100.

Permafrost carbon network researchers analyzed more than 100 sites in the Arctic and estimated that permafrost released an average of 1662 teragrams of carbon in the winter of 2003-2017. This is far more than previous studies had estimated.

And due to the lack of sites considered in view of the vastness of areas where permafrost is expanding, it is still a limited study. For example, if you consider the entire Arctic, the results can be even more alarming.


Related articles & sources:

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/10/global-impacts-thawing-arctic-permafrost-may-be-imminent

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-019-0592-8

Image Souce:

https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/QdWnGSo-CZ6WPbTEE0X-gH47zNw=/0x0:4240×2478/1200×0/filters:focal(0x0:4240×2478):no_upscale()/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/9107721/DSC00291.jpg

Katie Lopez

I previously studied Political Science and am now enrolled in Florida State University as an Applied Mathematics major. I am an established writer and am responsible for not only researching and writing new stories, but also proofreading and editing content here.

3713 Steve Hunt Road, Ft Lauderdale Florida, 33311
[email protected]
561-523-7467
Katie Lopez
Continue Reading

Support Xaski News

We rely on the generous support of our readers to keep this publication going. If you are interested in helping us host this site, please consider a donation through PayPal (email [email protected]). Please also considering signing up to the newsletter where we will keep you updated with new stories.

Trending